Audio Descriptions

Sculptures

Woman Resting (1962)

The work is called Woman Resting and was created in 1962. It is 21 cm tall and this version is made of bronze. The sculpture shows a woman sitting on a plinth. Her legs are mostly tucked under her body. She is leaning on her left arm and as a result her body leans towards the left. Her legs are big and curved. Her knees come forward and fill the front of the plinth. Her lower right leg and foot points out over the edge of the plinth.  Her torso is thin and she has small breasts. Her right arm reaches towards her right foot and touches the edge of the plinth. Her left arm reaches slightly behind her and leans on the space by her thigh. Her head is small and her gaze is pointed down. Her face is largely undetailed. She has a simple bun on the top of her head. 

As part of the Hannah Frank 110th Birthday Exhibition embroidery artist Myra Ostacchini wrapped one bronze version of this sculpture in bright threads of many different colours. In 1952, Hannah Frank decided to attend sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art. These classes were only meant to improve her knowledge of anatomy for her drawings but it actually marked the beginning of Hannah Frank’s career as a sculptor.

Reclining Woman (1963)

This sculpture is called Reclining Woman. It exists in plaster and bronze. This is the bronze version. It is 12.8 cm high and is from 1963. This sculpture is the first of many sculptures focussed on the subject of a reclining woman. The woman is voluptuous and depicted as lying on her side. Her right hip meets the floor. Her knees fall together to the right hand side of her body. Her feet are touching, with the left foot lying on top of the right foot. The figure’s torso twists towards the left hand side as she lowers her left shoulder to meet the floor. Her left breast rises upwards and her right breast lowers towards the floor. Her right arm is resting on the floor and reaches towards the woman’s head, which is detailed with simple facial features. Her shoulder rises up. Her arm bends at the elbow and her hand reaches towards her shoulder. This work was exhibited at the Royal Scottish Academy. Hannah Frank’s career as a sculptor started in 1952 after the artist attended sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art in an attempt to improve her knowledge of anatomy for her drawings. She was tutored by Benno Schotz who encouraged her to pursue sculpture.

Reclining Woman (1964)

Reclining Woman was created in 1964 by hannah Frank. The sculpture has been cast in bronze and is 20.2 cm tall. It depicts a woman reclining back onto her arms. The bottom of her back meets the floor. Her curved legs reach up and away from each other. At her angular knees, her legs bend and her feet travel to the ground. Her left foot is stretched further and her right foot rests slightly behind. He elongated torso shows two small, pointed breasts. Her arms travel straight down and her forearms rest on the ground, holding up her torso. Her neck is elongated and reaches a small head. She has a curves nose and small ears and mouth. Her eyes look towards her body. She has a small bun on the top of her head. This work is one of many created by hannah Frank based on the subject of a reclining figure. It is also one of the first sculptures to show hannah Frank’s move away from a naturalistic style to a more abstracted style in which her figures are often proportionally abstracted and elongated. This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute and Royal Scottish Academy. In 1952, after many years of creating black and white, pen and ink drawings, Frank began her career as a sculptor. This was as a result of attending classes at the Glasgow School of Art in Sculpture. She attended these classes primarily to improve her knowledge of drawing, but then sculpture became her main focus.

Pensive Head (1968)

This work is called Pensive Head and was made by hannah Frank in 1968. It is made of 47 cm tall and is this particular version is made of plaster. Pensive head is an example of hannah Frank’s move away from the biographical, naturalistic busts of her early sculptures and towards busts with more elongated features, something she had already been experimenting with in her sculptures of full figures. Like the sculpture Sleeping Head from 1958, the bust begins from just above the breasts of the figure. Her arms are stretched out towards the viewer and at the elbows her forearms turn inwards and towards the face of the figure. Her right arm stretches up and cups her right cheek. Her left arm reaches and holds the right wrist. The figure has a long neck and an oval shaped face, which is slightly turned to her left. Her facial features are defined. This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute and the Royal Scottish Academy.  In 1952, after many years of creating black and white, pen and ink drawings, hannah Frank began her career as a sculptor. This was as a result of attending classes at the Glasgow School of Art in Sculpture. She attended these classes primarily to improve her knowledge of drawing, but then sculpture became her main focus.

Bird Woman (1969)

 

In 1969 Hannah Frank created Bird Woman, a sculpture of which several bronze casts have been made. It is 43.2 cm tall. A woman sits crossed legged on a plinth. Her right foot is at the front and juts over the edge. Her legs are curved and soft with angular knees and flat feet. Her wide hips rise and her curve to create a thin waist. The length of the torso is exaggerated and at the top of it are the woman’s breasts which hang down. She has her head tilted up to the sky and her arms reach up too. They bend sharply at the elbows, bringing her forearms close to her face. The woman brings her hands over her face.The sculpture Woman with Bird of 1955 is very similar in terms of composition.This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute. In 1952 hannah Frank began to pursue a career as a sculptor. This was after she attended sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art.

Seated Figure (1970)

This sculpture is called Seated FIgure. A plaster cast and bronze casts exist of this piece. This particular work is made of plaster. It measures at 34 cm tall and was created in 1970. Depicted is a woman sitting with her legs outstretched. Her feet lie flat on the ground and seem to meld into the plinth. Her form is very soft and her shins curve gently into her knees which then curve into her thighs. The figure’s torso is upright. The proportions of the torso are not as small and exaggerated as some of Hannah Frank’s other sculptures. The woman’s arms travel down and disappear between her knees. Her head is tilted down towards her body and has very few features, apart from the curve of her nose and her ears. In 1952, hannah Frank decided to attend sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art. These classes were only meant to improve her knowledge of anatomy for her drawings but it actually marked the beginning of Frank’s career as a sculptor.

Seated Figure (1973)

This work is called Seated Figure and was created in 1973 by Frank. It measures at 45.8 cm and this version is made of plaster. This is one of many works created by Frank which has the title Seated Figure. It shows a woman sitting. Her legs are very round and large. They stretch out in front of her and bend at the knees. Her feet come to rest under her knees. The figure has a very thin torso which is detailed with a belly button and small breasts. Her incredibly long arms stretch down and rest on her knees. The woman’s head is detailed simply and is pointed slightly up. Her hair is gathered in a bun at the bottom of her head. In 1952, after many years of creating black and white, pen and ink drawings, Frank began her career as a sculptor. This was as a result of attending classes at the Glasgow School of Art in Sculpture. She attended these classes primarily to improve her knowledge of drawing, but then sculpture became her main focus.

Reclining Figure (1975)

This work is one of many titled Reclining Figure. This particular sculpture was made in 1975 and is made of bronze, although it also exists in plaster. Its height is 25.2 cm. The sculpture depicts a clothed female figure. She is leaning back on her elbows and has her feet stretched in front of her. Her feet are parallel to each other and their soles lie flat on the ground. At the figure’s ankles fall the hem of her dress. The form of her legs is visible as her knees point up and her thighs travel down to meet her hips further back on the plinth. The woman’s torso is leaning back onto bent elbows. At her breasts her arms travel down to the ground. Her forearms lay flat on the floor and she holds her hips. The figure has a small head. She has no hair, and only her nose and ears can be seen.This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute. In 1952, after many years of creating black and white, pen and ink drawings, Hannah Frank began her career as a sculptor. This was as a result of attending classes at the Glasgow School of Art in Sculpture. She attended these classes primarily to improve her knowledge of drawing, but then sculpture became her main focus

Waiting Woman (1978)

This sculpture depicts a solitary figure sitting on a block. It is called Waiting Woman and was made in 1978. This version is made of plaster and is 38 cm high. On the back right hand corner of the plinth is a rectangular bench. On the left hand side of this bench, in the centre of the composition, is a female figure. She sits on the bench. Her torso sits straight up. The woman wears a dress, which reaches from her ankles to her wrists. Her head is an oval shape and gazes down to her lap. Apart from her nose and her ears, there is very little detail on her face. Her arms fall to her lap and her hands rest on her thighs. The figure’s legs, the form of which is visible through her dress, are parallel to each other. Her feet sit a short distance away from each other, with their soles on the floor.  This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute. In 1952, hannah Frank decided to attend sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art. These classes were only meant to improve her knowledge of anatomy for her drawings but it actually marked the beginning of Hannah Frank’s career as a sculptor.

Seated Figure (1979)

This work is from 1979 and is called Seated Figure. This particular version is made of bronze and is 30.5 cm high. The sculpture depicts a figure sitting upright, with her feet meeting at the centre of the composition causing her knees to point upright. The figure has a straight back and her elbows rest on her thigh. Her hands travel inwards and hold onto the opposite knees. Her head is undecorated apart from a deep nose and ears. This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute and the Royal Scottish Academy. In 1952 Hannah Frank began to pursue a career as a sculptor. This was after she attended sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art.

Seated Figure (1981)

This plaster version of the sculpture Seated Figure, which was created in 1981. It is one of many sculptures created by Frank with the name Seated Figure and it is 38 cm high. The sculpture depicts a woman sitting on a plinth. Her head is oval shaped and is gazing up. Her hair is in a bun at the nape of her neck. Her eyes are shut. The woman is wearing a long dress which covers her from her ankles to her wrists. She sits upright. The form of her breasts is visible through the dress. Her left ankle crosses over her right ankle and her knees push out. In her lap, the figure’s hands meet. This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute. In 1952 Frank began to pursue a career as a sculptor. This was after she attended sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art.

Double Figure (1984)

Double Figure was created by Frank in 1984. It is a plaster version and it measures at 46 cm. Two figures are depicted in this work. They are very similar in terms of style. Both have oval shaped heads, are wearing long dresses which obscure much of their bodies and both are cut off at their knees by the plinth. However, their bodies are arranged in a different way. The figure on the left is set slightly behind the other. Her right arm is on her hip and her left is obscured by the woman on the right. She gazes up to the right. The woman on the right brings her hands together in front of her hips. She looks down to the right. 

This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute.

Frank’s career as a sculptor started in 1952 after the artist attended sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art in an attempt to improve her knowledge of anatomy for her drawings. She was tutored by Benno Schotz who encouraged her to pursue sculpture.

Seated Figure (1987)

This work is called Seated Figure and was created by Hannah Frank in 1987. This  is a plaster version of the sculpture which measures at 30.5 cm. The sculpture depicts a woman sitting with her legs tucked under her. She leans on her left arm. Her hand holds the edge of the plinth. She leans slightly to the left and the bottom of her right legs start to come out from under her. The figure’s right arm rests next to her right leg, also holding the edge of the plinth. The woman is wearing a dress which obscures most of her body, although the form of her breasts is still visible. She looks directly at the viewer, her face passive and simply designed. This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute. In 1952, after many years of creating black and white, pen and ink drawings, Hannah Frank began her career as a sculptor. This was as a result of attending classes at the Glasgow School of Art in Sculpture. She attended these classes primarily to improve her knowledge of drawing, but then sculpture became her main focus.

Double Figure (1993)

This work is called Double Figure and was made by Frank in 1993. This version is made of plaster and is 47 cm tall. This is the first sculpture in a series of works made in succession and titled Double Figure. Frank made many sculptures by this name, but this particular set which she created from 1993-1994 explores two figures standing closely and looking at each other. Each time the sculptures move further away from each other. Both figures in this work are similar. They are probably women. They wear long dresses, and have oval shaped heads decorated with noses and ears. Their bodies are long and mostly camouflaged by dresses, although their breasts are visible. Both figures rise from just above the knee. However, in their arrangement, the women differ. The left hand figure is at the front of the composition and her body partially obscures that of the other women. Her arms drop and she holds her hands in front of her stomach. Her gaze is to the left. The right hand woman clasps her hands together just under her breasts. She glances at the women in the foreground. This work was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute and the Royal Scottish Academy. Frank’s career as a sculptor started in 1952 after the artist attended sculpture classes at the Glasgow School of Art in an attempt to improve her knowledge of anatomy for her drawings. She was tutored by Benno Schotz who encouraged her to pursue sculpture.

Drawings

Sea Story (1929)

1929, Pen and ink, 34.5cm x 22.9cm, Private Collection, Glasgow

The main focal point of this composition, although not in the centre of the image but at the top left
hand side, is a powerful female face. She faces the viewer and looks very confident, engaging with us
with a strong eye contact.
The woman is naked and is standing up with very long straight flowing hair, fine, elegant, and
untangled. All the lines of these individual strands of hair flow towards the focal point which is the
top of her head and which is out of view, just outside the frame of the drawing.
Since all the elements of the drawings are not visible as wholes, [as a whole] the artwork leads the
viewer to imagine what stands beyond the composition.
Her right hand is raised towards her shoulder as she grasps strands of her long-flowing hair. Her left
hand is stretched out from the elbow outwards. It appears as if she is clasping or gripping strands of
her hair as if she was trying to break through this mass of hair in front of her. Her very sharp
fingertips add to this interpretation as they are alluding to scissors – yet the feeling on her face
remains very serene.
The rest of her body disappears. We cannot see her legs or her feet.
However, two feet appear at the top right hand side of the drawing. Ankles and toes are visible and
stand right next to the woman’s face. The feet are entangled in the strands of hair which appear like
ropes binding them. Could they be her feet? Or someone else’s?
These feet are not going to go anywhere and seem to be trapped. In fact, the whole scene appears as
if the woman s trapped in her own hair and trying to make her way through.
The effect that Hannah Frank has created in with lines to form long flowing hair reached down to the
bottom of the composition where thick black lines start to appear as a well as a strand of seaweed
reaching up and beginning to coil.
Behind the seaweed and in between the strands of hair, appears a single fish, swimming to the right
hand side of the composition. It alludes to the title of the drawing, Sea Story, and cultivates our
imagination. It is very unusual to come across animals in the art of Hannah Frank, and in fact this
piece in her only work showcasing a maritime theme.
The drawing has a strong Art Nouveau feeling. We can see the influence of Mackintosh as the hair is
merging into natural elements. Nature was a constant inspiration in the work of Hannah Frank.